Trauma Monthly

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Propofol Versus Midazolam for Procedural Sedation of Anterior Shoulder Dislocation in Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Hamid Reza Hatamabadi 1 , Ali Arhami Dolatabadi 2 , Hojjat Derakhshanfar 2 , Somaye Younesian 2 and Ensieh Ghaffari Shad 2 , *
Authors Information
1 Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
2 Department of Emergency Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
Article information
  • Trauma Monthly: May 31, 2015, 20 (2); e13530
  • Published Online: May 20, 2015
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: July 11, 2013
  • Revised: April 29, 2014
  • Accepted: May 26, 2014
  • DOI: 10.5812/traumamon.13530

To Cite: Hatamabadi H R, Arhami Dolatabadi A, Derakhshanfar H, Younesian S, Ghaffari Shad E. Propofol Versus Midazolam for Procedural Sedation of Anterior Shoulder Dislocation in Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial, Trauma Mon. 2015 ; 20(2):e13530. doi: 10.5812/traumamon.13530.

Abstract
Copyright © 2015, Trauma Monthly. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Patients and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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